Education

Lectures, Seminars & Workshops

Lectures, Seminars and Workshops available to the business and professional community.

EducationEducation: Currently Available Topics

  • Psychological Aspects of Work-Related Injury
  • Mood Disorders Affecting Physical Pain
  • Personality Types in Medical Management
  • Overcoming Fear of Re-Injury
  • Catastrophic InjuriesSomatoform Disorders - Somatoform Pain and Conversion
  • Factitious disorders
  • Depression and Anxiety Complicating Recovery from Work Injury
  • Factors in Lumbar, Cervical & Carpal Tunnel Injuries
  • Posttraumatic and Acute Stress Disorders
  • Pre- and Post Surgical Cases: Psychological Complications and Solutions
  • The Aging Injured Worker
  • Personal Injury: Exacerbated, Exaggerated or Fabricated

Seminars are typically scheduled on Friday mornings, although alternate accommodations can be made for regional, annual, lunch and learn, or other special presentation needs.

To arrange a seminar, call Atlanta Medical Psychology at 404-252-6454 to determine date availability and coordinate media needs. Past audiences include:

  • The Georgia Board of Workers' Compensation
  • Institute of Continuing Legal Education
  • Georgia Association of Occupational Medicine
  • Georgia Nursing Association
  • Risk management associations
  • Nurse case management companies
  • Employers and insurers

Case Management Update

This Weeks Topic: “Pain in your Brain"

Question: "He is taking pain killers and anti-depressants, and he limps around like he was wounded in a war."

Dr. Adams replies: "In the last half of the 20th century, the resistance to directly addressing psychological problems actually increased. We had a ready stream of medications that blamed and treated the brain for our various incapacities to deal with our lives. Some euphemistically referred to this as the Prozac Generation.

Individuals, as a first response to discord or burden, sought medications that would eradicate the "bad feelings." Some became dependent upon medications such as Xanax for daily coping, and/or were very reluctant to relinquish their Paxil for their dysphoric mood. When you see patients that navigated that period, you find individuals who had very little understanding of how to cope with their lives, their losses, and their disappointments, but they may have had a medicine cabinet full of various agents prescribed for their inconsistently reported emotional problems.

It mattered comparatively little that the marriage was a shambles, they were failing on their job, the kids were out of control, debt was insurmountable, or there was conflict in most of their interactions. The patients learned that this was a “problem in my brain”, and medication will fix that. Soon many thought of themselves as bipolar, ADD, etc., accurate or not, because it became both "fashionable" and medicated. The reasons for carefully examining a patient is to both discover the probable conflicts that are giving rise to their misery, and to enable the patients to realize that they do not have to assume a passive role in the solution of life's ills.

They can effectively and permanently change many of life's ills, and, importantly, they can feel pride and success that they have done so. Because we can find brain circuitry that impacts mood, anxiety, and pain, does not necessarily mean that putting chemicals in the body is the route to learning effective problem solving and conflict resolution. We chart pain behaviors. We make note of the patient's vocal utterances of pain, facial grimacing, and the changes in motor behavior when walking, sitting and/or standing.

We are also told not to rely upon those physical manifestations of pain behavior as a true barometer of misery, since no two people demonstrate the same behaviors. We see patients with identical physical diagnostic findings that have quite different pain behaviors. Some remain stoic while others thrash about in pure agony. An article (Llyod, D.M.., Findlay, G. et al. (2014) Illness behavior in patients with chronic low back pain and activation of the affective circuitry of the brain. Psychosomatic Medicine, 76, 413-341) that addresses the connection between differences in pain behavior is an example. The authors note that areas of the brain known to be associated with emotional functioning are activated when a patient is in pain. This may ultimately tell us if the emotionality of one patient in pain is in great excess to another patient with the same back problem, but it does not tell us why the patient views and responds to the pain in such an excessive manner.

The problem with specifying pain as a brain activation problem runs the risk of having the patient dismiss responsibility for effectively coping with pain. As it is, many patients relinquish pain control to a series of narcotic medications. They do not seek a more adaptive response to the pain; they merely want it immediately eradicated, regardless of medication side effects. The response to many aspects of life that are difficult have become labeled as "disorders."

The individual becomes the victim of a disorder that is best treated without them exerting effort beyond being certain that s/he takes the prescribed medication. Perhaps it is past time for the patient to assume more individual responsibility, or then again, perhaps we shall soon find an area of the brain responsible for Road Rage Disorder or Marital Disappointment Disorder.
_______________________________________
website: http://psychological.com

Online Referral: http://psychological.com/consultation-form/

Blog: http://psychological.com/blog/

Forums: http://psychological.com/discuss/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dr-David-B-Adams-Atlanta-Medical-Psychology/125163154184131

Linkedin: Dr. David B. Adams

Twitter: @doctoradams

Google Places: https://plus.google.com/+PsychologicalDoctorAdams/posts

________________________________________

Bio

Dr. David B. Adams is Board Certified in Clinical Psychology (ABPP) and specializes in the treatment of mood, anxiety and pain disorders in adults.

In addition to his private practice, Dr. Adams consults to physicians, attorneys, employers and insurers in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain, posttraumatic stress disorder, disability determination and psychological complications in work-related injuries. He performs stimulator-implant-candidacy evaluations.

Dr. Adams is a Distinguished Practitioner in the National Academy of Practice in Psychology, a member of the American Psychosomatic Society, the Association of Medicine and Psychiatry, and a platinum member of the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology.

He is Fellow of the Academy of Clinical Psychology and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and it's Division of Psychologists in Independent Practice, the Division of Psychotherapy; the Society of Clinical Psychology, the American Academy of Pain Management and the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine.

Dr. Adams is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati, Xavier University, and the University of Alabama with a postdoctoral fellowship from the Institute of Clinical Training of the Devereux Foundation (Philadelphia).

Dr. Adams is the author of greater than sixty articles on the impact of psychological functioning upon claims of disability. He is a well-known presenter of seminars and regional workshops, addressing the psychological aspects of physical disease and injury.

His practice is located in The Medical Quarters, adjacent to Northside, Scottish Rite and Emory Saint Joseph's Hospitals in north Atlanta.

Atlanta Medical Psychology
5555 Peachtree-Dunwoody Road, N.E.
The Medical Quarters - Suite 251
Atlanta, GA 30342-1703.
404.252.6454
404-851-9286 Fax
psychological.com
AtlantaMedicalPsychology@gmail.com

_______________________________________

website: http://psychological.com

Online Referral: http://psychological.com/consultation-form/

Blog: http://psychological.com/blog/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Dr-David-B-Adams-Atlanta-Medical-Psychology/125163154184131

Linkedin: Dr. David B. Adams

Twitter: @doctoradams

Google Places: https://plus.google.com/+PsychologicalDoctorAdams/posts

________________________________________

Bio

Dr. David B. Adams is Board Certified in Clinical Psychology (ABPP) and specializes in the treatment of mood, anxiety and pain disorders in adults.

In addition to his private practice, Dr. Adams consults to physicians, attorneys, employers and insurers in the diagnosis and treatment of chronic pain, posttraumatic stress disorder, disability determination and psychological complications in work-related injuries. He performs stimulator-implant-candidacy evaluations.

Dr. Adams is a Distinguished Practitioner in the National Academy of Practice in Psychology, a member of the American Psychosomatic Society, the Association of Medicine and Psychiatry, and a platinum member of the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology.

He is Fellow of the Academy of Clinical Psychology and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and it's Division of Psychologists in Independent Practice, the Division of Psychotherapy; the Society of Clinical Psychology, the American Academy of Pain Management and the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine.

Dr. Adams is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati, Xavier University, and the University of Alabama with a postdoctoral fellowship from the Institute of Clinical Training of the Devereux Foundation (Philadelphia).

Dr. Adams is the author of greater than sixty articles on the impact of psychological functioning upon claims of disability. He is a well-known presenter of seminars and regional workshops, addressing the psychological aspects of physical disease and injury.

His practice is located in The Medical Quarters, adjacent to Northside, Scottish Rite and Emory Saint Joseph's Hospitals in north Atlanta.

Atlanta Medical Psychology
5555 Peachtree-Dunwoody Road, N.E.
The Medical Quarters - Suite 251
Atlanta, GA 30342-1703.
404.252.6454
404-851-9286 Fax
psychological.com
AtlantaMedicalPsychology@gmail.com

 

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