Dr. David B. Adams – Psychological Blog

Psychology of Injury, Pain, Anxiety and Depression

Panel Physicians

A personality disorder cannot be caused by an adult injury. End of story.

A personality disorder is a defect in thinking (cognition), emotional expression (affect) and interpersonal relations.

A personality disorder interferes with creation and maintenance of appropriate adult relationships and interferes with creation and implementation of an occupation.

Personality Disorder refers to an enduring pattern of experience and behavior that differs from the expectancies of your culture. It may manifest itself as problems in the ways you interpret events around you, the way in which you express your emotions, the means by which you interact with others or how you handle your impulses. People with a personality disorder display their maladaptive patterns in a range of social and interpersonal interactions, and the pattern causes problems in social and occupational functioning.

A personality disorder is well entrenched by adulthood and is often immutable even to modification.

Its only relationship to injury is that it complicates recovery. And often what someone thinks that they are treating (a clinical disorder such as a pain disorder or mood disorder) is, in fact, an undiagnosed personality disorder.

The personality disorder existed before injury and will exist even if all physical symptoms are resolved.

Its only relevance to work-injury is that it governs how the individual handles the injury…decisions he/she makes and his/her willingness to be compliant with care.

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