Dr. David B. Adams – Psychological Blog

Psychology of Illness, Pain, Anxiety and Depression

Anti-Depressants

Many back injured patients become depressed. Some would say that most become depressed. However, very few seek treatment for their depression.

Even if they were depressed prior to injury, and, again, there are data to support that pre-existing depression increases the risk of injury, there is a responsibility for treating the exacerbation of the depression caused by the injury. Once again, few of these patients would want/accept care even if offered especially if mental health care is not sanctioned by their family/community.

When in pain, the individual sleeps poorly, concentration is impaired, they eat out of boredom, they are irritable and very little of life is enjoyable to them. Anti-depressants have become an effective way of helping patients cope with pain.

Often antidepressants are sufficiently therapeutic that the patient can taper his/her narcotic pain medication (which itself can trigger depression).

Thus, antidepressants can be a very cost effective way of dealing with the painful residuals of work-injury.

Comments for this post are closed.

Head Injury but not Brain Injury

A surgeon seeing wanted a psychological evaluation of his patient. The patient is not depressed. He simply has a back injury …
Read Blog Post

dilemma

Dilemma

The Dilemma: “When a patient reports difficulty returning to work, malingering need not be the first concern. A more central …
Read Blog Post

Resistance to Recovery: Expectancy of Recovery

Along with diagnosis and treatment is the central issue of prognosis for outcome. The patient seeks to know not only the …
Read Blog Post