Dr. David B. Adams – Psychological Blog

Psychology of Injury, Pain, Anxiety and Depression

PPD – Permanent and Partial Disability

The PPD Rating

PPD“There can be, and often is, a vast difference between what a clinician establishes as a PPD (permanent and partial disability) rating, what the insurer or attorneys need from a PPD rating, and how the patient responds to a PPD rating.

A physician assigns a PPD rating of 15% of whole body subsequent to back injury and surgery. To the patient, this means that “he thinks that I am 85% cured…or 85% fine…or only 15% impaired…or able to do 85% of my work…etc.”

To the patient, especially (which is most) a patient with no experience in disability determination, s/he is being minimized.

Patient’s will, by contast, state that “I expect him to find me 100% disabled because I cannot do what I used to do,” and there is some justification to that belief. The patient can no longer perform a range of tasks and may lack the skill set for other tasks. To the patient, s/he is therefore completely disabled.

By contrast, the diagnosis of major depression or post traumatic stress disorder is not, in fact, a statement of disability. There may be no permanent impairment resulting from either. However, for some patients depression associated with loss of a career or PTSD associated with a location in which trauma occurred there may, indeed, be a permanent disability.

There has, and always will be, a differentiation between the level of disability assessed by a clinician based upon functional capacity and the patient’s own belief that life will never be the same.

It has been a cornerstone to psychological care for the injured to be certain that the patient does not perceive a disability rating as the lack of understanding by others. A PPD rating is not a measure of career potential or suffering, merely a measure of the limitations that will now be encountered.

Atlanta Medical Psychology

Comments for this post are closed.

The Last Minute Bail Out

As they proceed toward settlement, an injured worker, at the very last moment, suddenly asks for another opinion, a change …
Read Blog Post

Defensive Fear and Anger

Those who express warmth toward you are not necessarily fond of you. Those who express hostility are not necessarily angry …
Read Blog Post

Grievous Error in Psychotherapy

There is a growing body of research that psychological care (Eg. cognitive behavioral psychotherapy) may not be effective …
Read Blog Post